July 31, 2008

Design A Handmade Frog-Themed Card Destined to Become a Treasured Keepsake

By Kara Hiltz

PrinTales: Jill Dunn of InkGenious Discusses Her Motivations for Card-Making and Shows You How to Make One of Her Exquisite Cards

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When life gets hectic, many people seek a relaxing and creative outlet. Jill Dunn of InkGenious found her creative release through card-making and other design crafts.

As the mother of four young boys ranging in age from one to nine years old, Jill has a hectic schedule and finds it challenging to pursue cherished hobbies such as writing, photography, interior design, and floral arrangements.

Jill enjoys card-making because it integrates so well with her busy home life. "I have a passion for design in its many forms and making cards is a quick and satisfying way to get a little design fix and a little 'me' time without taking too much time away from my most important jobs as a mom and wife," Jill told us.

About a year and half ago, Jill started her blog, InkGenious  so she could share her latest card creations — along with updates on her home life — with family and friends.

Jill uses an HP PSC 1410 All-In-One printer to supplement her card crafts. She uses her printer primarily to generate personalized text and inspirational quotes that complement her card. "With the variety of fonts available, I'm able to keep my projects looking fresh and current with the latest trends," says Jill. In addition, Jill reminds us that finding stamps to express your written sentiments gets costly, so printing those sentiments saves money.

How to Make Your Own Frog Card (Ribbit), Courtesy of Jill Dunn

To duplicate the card Jill created for Databazaar Blog (see photo above), you first need to gather the following supplies:

  • Green card stock
  • White card stock
  • Black card stock
  • Cosmo Cricket patterned paper from the "Get Happy" collection
  • Hero Arts frog stamp
  • StazOn waterproof black ink
  • Coloring materials ("I used watercolor pencils, but anything would work," Jill says.)
  • McGill scalloped 1 7/8-inch square punch
  • GlitzItNow Design rub-ons
  • GlitzItNow Design icings (black dots)
  • Offray black gingham ribbon
  • Foam square for dimension
  • 2Peas Scrapbook font

Now you can duplicate Jill's card in seven easy steps:

  1. Create a standard 5 1/2 x 4 1/4 inch card base by cutting your green card stock to 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches and folding it in half.
  2. Decide on your card's written text and choose an appropriate computer font. Print the text directly on your green card-stock card base. "I usually print it out on a test piece of paper first to make sure that I am happy with the placement, font size, etc.," recommends Jill.
  3. Cut a piece of your patterned paper "I used 5 1/4 x 2 1/4 inches," Jill told us. Create a mat for the paper with black card stock and attach the whole piece to your card base.
  4. Stamp your frog image on a 1 1/2-inch square piece of white card stock, adding any color you desire.
  5. Mat your frog image with a 1 7/8-inch square piece of green card stock that you've scalloped with your punch.
  6. Attach the entire frog piece to another piece of white card stock (2 x 2 inches), and then attach that to your card with foam squares to make it pop out from the card.
  7. Add other decorations, such as ribbons, rub-ons, and any other embellishments you desire.

That is one inktastic card. Thank you Jill. You are indeed an inkgenius.

About PrinTales
If every picture tells a story, then every printer must contain several bookshelves' worth. In PrinTales, we bring these stories to you by profiling people who use their printers in a creative manner. Think of it as "once upon a time" for the digital generation.

Article Filed Under: HP Inkjet Cartridges PrinTales Printers
  • August 06, 2008 Nancy G.

    What a cool card Jill! Thanks for sharing!
    :-)

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